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Tebtebba

Tebtebba

Working for the respect, protection and fulfillment of indigenous peoples’ rights and operationalization of indigenous peoples’ self-determined sustainable development

Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education) is an indigenous peoples’ organization born out of the need for heightened advocacy to have the rights of indigenous peoples respected, protected and fulfilled worldwide. It also advocates and works on the elaboration and operationalization of indigenous peoples’ sustainable, self-determined development. Tebtebba actively engaged in the processes which led to the adoption of international human rights law and other international instruments, policies and agreements. These include the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and the establishment of spaces within the United Nations, such as the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, among others. 

Established in 1996, Tebtebba seeks to promote and disseminate widely indigenous peoples worldviews, their perspectives on key issues such as individual and collective human rights, sustainable development, climate change, biodiversity, traditional knowledge, customary laws and governance, conflict transformation, gender, etc. To gather and consolidate such perspectives, Tebtebba brings representatives of indigenous peoples’ organizations, networks and communities together to elaborate and deepen their views and positions and plan out education and awareness-raising campaigns they can do jointly.  These are also venues to further reinforce their capacities to take the lead in policy advocacy and campaigns on all issues affecting them.

Tebtebba, a word used by the indigenous Kankana-ey Igorot of Northern Philippines, refers to a process of collectively discussing issues and presenting diverse views with the aim of reaching agreements, common positions, and concerted actions.

Tebtebba has Special Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations and is legally registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission of the Republic of the Philippines under SEC. Registration No. B199600209.

 

 

CBD

Convention on Biological Diversity

The Earth's biological resources are vital to humanity's economic and social development. As a result, there is a growing recognition that biological diversity is a global asset of tremendous value to present and future generations. At the same time, the threat to species and ecosystems has never been so great as it is today. Species extinction caused by human activities continues at an alarming rate.

In response, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) convened the Ad Hoc Working Group of Experts on Biological Diversity in November 1988 to explore the need for an. international convention on biological diversity. Soon after, in May 1989, it established the Ad Hoc Working Group of Technical and Legal Experts to prepare an international legal instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity. The experts were to take into account "the need to share costs and benefits between developed and developing countries" as well as "ways and means to support innovation by local people".

By February 1991, the Ad Hoc Working Group had become known as the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee. Its work culminated on 22 May 1992 with the Nairobi Conference for the Adoption of the Agreed Text of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

The Convention was opened for signature on 5 June 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (the Rio "Earth Summit"). It remained open for signature until 4 June 1993, by which time it had received 168 signatures. The Convention entered into force on 29 December 1993, which was 90 days after the 30th ratification. The first session of the Conference of the Parties was scheduled for 28 November – 9 December 1994 in the Bahamas.

The Convention on Biological Diversity was inspired by the world community's growing commitment to sustainable development. It represents a dramatic step forward in the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.

 

 

ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity

The ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) is an intergovernmental regional centre of excellence that facilitates co-operation and co-ordination among the members of ASEAN, and with relevant national governments, regional and international organizations on the Conservation and Sustainable use of biological diversity, guided by fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of such biodiversity.

 

 

Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services

The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is the intergovernmental body which assesses the state of biodiversity and of the ecosystem services it provides to society, in response to requests from decision makers. IPBES is placed under the auspices of four United Nations entities: UNEP, UNESCO, FAO and UNDP and administered by UNEP. Its secretariat is hosted by the German government and located on the UN campus, in Bonn, Germany. One thousand scientists from all over the world currently contribute to the work of IPBES on a voluntary basis. They are nominated by their government or an organisation, and selected by the MEP. Peer review forms a key component of the work of IPBES to ensure that a range of views is reflected in its work, and that the work is complete to the highest scientific standards.

 

 

SwedBio

SwedBio is a knowledge interface on resilience & development at Stockholm Resilience Centre.

Our mission is to enable knowledge generation, dialogue and exchange between practitioners, policymakers and scientists for development and implementation of policies and methods – which contribute to poverty alleviation, equity, sustainable livelihoods and social-ecological systems rich in biodiversity that persist, adapt and transform under global change.

 

 

http://iifb.indigenousportal.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/iifb-banner.jpg

The International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) was formed during the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in November 1996. The IIFB is a collection of representatives from indigenous governments, indigenous non-governmental organizations and indigenous scholars and activists that organize around the CBD and other important international environmental meetings to help coordinate indigenous strategies at these meetings, provide advice to the government parties, and influence the interpretations of government obligations to recognize and respect indigenous rights to the knowledge and resources

 

The portal aims to provide indigenous peoples and the general public with relevant information and resources on climate change and indigenous peoples, and on REDD+ or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Specifically, it serves as the portal for the project "Ensuring the Effective Participation of Indigenous Peoples in Global and National REDD Processes." The website is managed by Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples International Centre for Policy Research and Education) and is made possible through the support of the Norwegian International Forest and Climate Initiative through the Norwegian Agency for Development and Cooperation (NORAD).

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